October 21st
Eritrea is ‘camel country’, they are everywhere both wild and domesticated, this one was on duty at Demas [ 80 km south of Keren.]  From a train enthusiast website, with about a dozen pics of the steam trains in Eritrea.

Eritrea is ‘camel country’, they are everywhere both wild and domesticated, this one was on duty at Demas [ 80 km south of Keren.]  From a train enthusiast website, with about a dozen pics of the steam trains in Eritrea.

20111021 @ 1002
October 4th
Screenshot from a you tube video.

Screenshot from a you tube video.

20111004 @ 1707
September 14th
Photo used as an avatar by one of the members on a discussion forum based in Qatar.http://www.kassala-asc.com/

Photo used as an avatar by one of the members on a discussion forum based in Qatar.
http://www.kassala-asc.com/

20110914 @ 1146
September 5th
A youth from the Amarar tribe. From “Desert and water gardens of the Red Sea, being an account of the natives and the shore formations of the coast” by Cyril Crossland. Photo circa 1912. The editor notes the absence of sewn clothing.
The book was written by a British explorer who was based at Donugab, about 100 miles north of Port Sudan.
Available at chrome://epubreader/content/catalog.xul in archive.org
Crossland describes the typical Beja man [though he knew them as Hamitic] like this.
"When we meet our friend we generally see a tall, well-made man,  light in build but strong and active, often good-looking, with a  pleasant and self-respecting expression. He may rise as we pass, to shew  respect, but offers no salutation unless his superior should salute  first.
If we speak to him he will address us respectfully, yet as an  equal, first shaking hands as he would to one of his own nation. If he  is not a very poor man, or engaged in manual labour, he is probably much  more gracefully dressed than we are, in the folds of yards of calico  looped about his person, leaving arms and neck free. True his hair, a  great fuzzy mop, plastered with mutton fat, looks a trifle ridiculous  and even unclean, the free use of grease in a tropical climate can be helpful. Or he may wear a  turban, which appears more dignified to European eyes, being more  familiar.
He displays his freedom, his membership of a desert community,  not only by his self-reliant look, but by his always carrying arms. As  we meet him, his camel has been tethered before the shop where he is  obtaining provisions, and his sword, shield, or spear given into the  merchant’s keeping, our mountaineer retaining only a dagger, stuck into a  loose heavy leather belt, or having its sheath bound round his arm,  just above the elbow. The former dagger is generally a curved blade nine  inches or so long, the latter a small broad dagger with a plain round handle. The sheaths are very  ornamental, bearing embossed patterns and strips of green leather among  the brown.
Neither is he anything but proud of the evidences of his  religion and superstitions. There may be a circular patch of dust in the  middle of his forehead, where he touched the ground, bowing in prayer,  and his amulets, paper charms wrapped up in little square leather cases  worn as a necklace, or, more often, tied round the arm immediately above  the elbow, and his string of prayer beads, are his principal ornaments.
He may wear a ring or two on his fingers, and a narrow band round his  arm, both of silver, while a thin curved skewer, of hard wood or ibex  horn, thrust through his hair, completes his adornment.
In conversation we find him generally intelligent, rarely  surly or ill-behaved. Having self-respect himself he appreciates and  returns politeness, and is not so foolish as to interpret it as  weakness.
In travelling through the desert any dusty old man will expect  you to give a friendly greeting, and the news, and smile upon you as a  friend. Unfortunately the language is rather a stumbling-block, as many  natives are not fluent in Arabic, and few British know the Hamitic  speech. However, for a friendly salutation Arabic (or perhaps any  language!) will suffice anywhere.

A youth from the Amarar tribe. From “Desert and water gardens of the Red Sea, being an account of the natives and the shore formations of the coast” by Cyril Crossland. Photo circa 1912. The editor notes the absence of sewn clothing.

The book was written by a British explorer who was based at Donugab, about 100 miles north of Port Sudan.

Available at chrome://epubreader/content/catalog.xul in archive.org

Crossland describes the typical Beja man [though he knew them as Hamitic] like this.

"When we meet our friend we generally see a tall, well-made man, light in build but strong and active, often good-looking, with a pleasant and self-respecting expression. He may rise as we pass, to shew respect, but offers no salutation unless his superior should salute first.

If we speak to him he will address us respectfully, yet as an equal, first shaking hands as he would to one of his own nation. If he is not a very poor man, or engaged in manual labour, he is probably much more gracefully dressed than we are, in the folds of yards of calico looped about his person, leaving arms and neck free. True his hair, a great fuzzy mop, plastered with mutton fat, looks a trifle ridiculous and even unclean, the free use of grease in a tropical climate can be helpful. Or he may wear a turban, which appears more dignified to European eyes, being more familiar.

He displays his freedom, his membership of a desert community, not only by his self-reliant look, but by his always carrying arms. As we meet him, his camel has been tethered before the shop where he is obtaining provisions, and his sword, shield, or spear given into the merchant’s keeping, our mountaineer retaining only a dagger, stuck into a loose heavy leather belt, or having its sheath bound round his arm, just above the elbow. The former dagger is generally a curved blade nine inches or so long, the latter a small broad dagger with a plain round handle. The sheaths are very ornamental, bearing embossed patterns and strips of green leather among the brown.

Neither is he anything but proud of the evidences of his religion and superstitions. There may be a circular patch of dust in the middle of his forehead, where he touched the ground, bowing in prayer, and his amulets, paper charms wrapped up in little square leather cases worn as a necklace, or, more often, tied round the arm immediately above the elbow, and his string of prayer beads, are his principal ornaments.

He may wear a ring or two on his fingers, and a narrow band round his arm, both of silver, while a thin curved skewer, of hard wood or ibex horn, thrust through his hair, completes his adornment.

In conversation we find him generally intelligent, rarely surly or ill-behaved. Having self-respect himself he appreciates and returns politeness, and is not so foolish as to interpret it as weakness.

In travelling through the desert any dusty old man will expect you to give a friendly greeting, and the news, and smile upon you as a friend. Unfortunately the language is rather a stumbling-block, as many natives are not fluent in Arabic, and few British know the Hamitic speech. However, for a friendly salutation Arabic (or perhaps any language!) will suffice anywhere.

20110905 @ 0916
August 17th

From a German site, a dozen pictures illustrate the rugged fighting in east Soudan during the time of the Mahdi’s battles against the British/Turkish army.

20110817 @ 1244
July 11th
Assuwan type of the Bisharin Race. Photo for sale on 121bid.com

Assuwan type of the Bisharin Race. Photo for sale on 121bid.com

20110711 @ 1009
May 18th
Waiting for tourists. Selected from a series of photos highlighting Sudan, and the April election experience in April 2010. This photo from February 2010. Photo # 35.
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/04/scenes_from_sudan.html

Waiting for tourists. Selected from a series of photos highlighting Sudan, and the April election experience in April 2010. This photo from February 2010. Photo # 35.

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/04/scenes_from_sudan.html

20100518 @ 1628
April 23rd
Having fun! Bisharin from near Jebel Elba in Halaib triangle.
Dig around!
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/conservation-egypt/files?hl=en

Having fun! Bisharin from near Jebel Elba in Halaib triangle.

Dig around!

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/conservation-egypt/files?hl=en

20100423 @ 0106
April 14th

Handmade goods are available to tourists at the eco-resort near Wadi El Gemal - north of the Halaib Triangle(?). Local Ababda guides lead trips just 6 km to the interior desert where a constructed pond attracts local wildlife.

http://www.wadielgemal.com/index.aspx?id=1

20100414 @ 0856
April 1st

great music vid. includes four guys doing a sword dance.

20100401 @ 2216